Motor difficulties in autism, explained

BY LAUREN SCHENKMAN

Most of my life from a early age I had problems with my hand righting and often got my hands slapped in school with a ruler.   Followed me all my life.   My eye hand coordination was always off and one of the reasons I stayed away from sports.  I also had anxiety for getting feedback from my parents about my walking .  On one of my jobs I was criticized for the way I walked.  In the employers mind I showed no sense of urgency.     Yet I did get things done.   – Greg

Most autistic people — 87 percent, according to the latest estimate — have some sort of motor difficulty, ranging from an atypical gait to problems with handwriting1. These issues are distinct from the repetitive behaviors considered to be a hallmark of autism. And yet, despite their prevalence, motor problems are not considered a core trait of autism, because they also occur with other conditions, such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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Confusion at the crossroads of autism and hearing loss

Hearing difficulties and autism often overlap, exacerbating autism traits and complicating diagnoses.

BY 

I can relate to having hearing loss on this article.  Important for kids and adults to get hearing checked – Greg

At the age of 3, Tyler spoke only about five words at a time, often with a stutter. Doctors initially thought he was deaf, and experts diagnosed him with auditory dyssynchrony, a condition that alters how the brain processes sound. But subsequent evaluations revealed that Tyler’s hearing was just fine.

Yet as Tyler grew, his speech problems — along with other atypical traits — led to a host of diagnoses, including speech apraxia, dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorderread more

How autism shapes sibling relationships

Having an autistic brother or sister can pose challenges, but it can also make children patient, empathetic and resilient.
BY 

I know my challenges at times effect how the family reacts to me. Good article. – Greg

In late March, Michelle Byamugisha reached out to a local celebrity in an email with the subject line “A Message for Your Biggest Fan, My Autistic Brother.” It was two weeks into the coronavirus-related lockdown, and her 34-year-old brother, who has significant speech challenges and likes to be called Mark B, was distraught. Deprived of his cooking class, bowling and other favorite activities, he was feeling so low he could barely get out of bed.

As the family discussed what to do, Byamugisha had an idea. Her brother is fascinated by weather and has for years tuned in every evening to broadcasts from meteorologist Steve Rudin of WJLA in Washington, D.C. What if Mark B heard from Rudin directly? That might jolt him out of the doldrums, Byamugisha reasoned. read more